corecouture

Essential sewing keeping me clothed and sane


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Plain and Simpler: Avoid Baggy-Thighed-Pants

This is my method to avoid baggy-thighed-pants (acknowledgement goes to Miranda for that title)

I’ve had loads of requests to explain what I do to avoid wrinkles at the back thigh on trousers. Firstly, a big thank you to you all who contacted me via e-mail, Pattern Review, personal messaging, blog comments etc etc etc. and your inherent trust in my abilities. I started replying to each one and then I got overwhelmed so Instead of replying to each and every one, here’s a post about what I do. Absolute disclaimer: this is what I do for me – I have no idea if it’s right, acceptable, taught, recognised or standard fitting procedure – but it works for me so why not try it – it could work for you too.

I’m now acknowledging those brave sewers who have publicity shown the world what what baggy-thigh-pants look like:

Tasha, Stephanie, Jennifer – thank you from the bottom of my ****

Trousers are notoriously difficult to fit because there are so many points of contact with the body – waist, hip, thigh, knee, calf, length and worst of all crotch! My advice – make a skirt -LOL! Just kidding, but really take your time, trace your pattern alterations (I know it’s a pain but think of the long-term gains), do not intend to make a pair of trousers, take a weekend and work on the fitting. Please believe me, it is time well invested and you will have a perfectly fitting crotch pattern for only YOU and it didn’t cost you a Craftsy class.

I’m starting from a toile that has good fitting crotch curve. Sorry I’m leaving this bit to you but here are some resources that you might find useful – my crotch experiments, Colette’s pant fitting cheat sheet, crotch measuring.

You are now going to be subjected to many images of my backside: if you want to see the original post then click on my bum!

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Back thigh adjustment on jean-style cords

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Early days of development – Here I moved the crotch curve. See how it rides up and there are still wrinkles on the back thigh

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Similar to pic 1. Reduced the depth of the back thigh only and pattern based on RTW Armani .

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No adjustments made at all and wrinkles galore!

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New trouser pattern with now almost automatic back thigh adjustment. Vogue 1204

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Wide leg trousers show much less wrinkling, so this could be an alternative option for fitting.

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Tapered trouser legs still need an shortening on the back thigh for me but not as much as fitted trousers maybe just an 1″ (2.5cm).

Here’s my method of removing those wrinkles that are so evident in RTW and many of my early hand made trousers. It happens at the cutting stage so I’m afraid if you have already cut and sewn – it’s too late! Do it next time.

First off, be brutally honest. Stand sideways in front of a mirror and measure or mark your front bit (know what I mean?) then mark or measure your back cheek crease.

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In my case the difference between the front and back is roundabout 4″ (10cms). Gosh – see that sway back? That’s another post just on its own!

Right, back to the topic for today. Now, following conventional fitting methods  you will be instructed to do all sorts of things with the crotch curve – see my pin stripe jeans above – lengthening, shortening and changing the angle of curve but my method is simpler and easier. I half the measurement taken from real life and fold this out of the way on the back pattern piece, close to but not at the crotch line.


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Take the back pattern piece and fold up half the difference of your measurements. In my case it’s 2″ (5cms). Make this fold below the crotch line that’s marked on the pattern piece. We are not altering the crotch curve but working below it.

At the side of the pattern there will be uneven edges – when cutting the fabric, gently curve this to join with your already perfected crotch. Please check your crotch point before doing this alteration see my crotch experiments above for how to do this.

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Edited for clarification: All the notches and marks on the back pattern piece will not line up with the front now. Either reposition the back notches or as I do, ignore them. Lengthen the back piece at the hem by the same amount you folded out.

I’m just at the beginning of making New Look K6231 trousers in a woven cotton with no stretch. In my previous post I recommended using a fabric with a bit of Lyrca so stay tuned for an update on how I totally ignore my own advice and how it all turns out in the end.

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OK, maybe I don’t heed my own advice all of the time – or is it just the nature of the fabric?


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Plain and simple

The other day I had a dental hygienist appointment and teenage son had the car so I had to take the bus and not wanting to be late I left the house early and when I arrived I then, of course, had a tonne of time to kill. I walked the local shops: bought a T-shirt, a loose cardigan, a pair of olive green jeans; visited but didn’t buy, the Textile Studio and bought a sewing magazine because it had three free patterns and thought I could look at the pictures as I sat in the waiting room. This, of course is all beside the point – the pattern is the point here. And, it turned out to be ultimately a very expensive trip to the hygienist!

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Anyway, one of the patterns was New Look 6231 – the jacket’s not my style but I quite fancied the very plain but perfectly serviceable trousers. In fact, these might actually be the same pattern that was used for the British Sewing Bee series 3 ep1. Does anyone know what patterns they use? I wouldn’t normally blog about something so plain and simple, but I’m really impressed and thought you should know about this little gem too.

The pattern is actually good value for money if you’re buying it on its own as you get at least three garments in one envelope.

 

 

Two darts at the back, waistband, invisible side zip, narrow legs and finish at ankle length.

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Boy, I am impressed with this little pattern!

I made this first pair – note first! – in a very fine plain black wool with just a touch of Lycra. I shortened the back thigh by 1″ and the next pair will be shortened another 1″, but these are perfectly wearable, no worse than RTW and I think will become a staple in my wardrobe.

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Because the pattern is so straightforward, it can easily be adapted to include front pockets of all designs, add turn-ups at the hems, include back welt pockets, capri or cropped lengths- the options are limitless. This pattern is replacing Clover for me.

Photographing black clothes is notoriously difficult, so please just believe me when I say these are great!

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The new cardigan

 

I was rather blessed that the crotch fitted perfectly straight out of the envelop which might go some way to explain my joy.  The only thing I would suggest is that any fabric you chose to use, consider 1% or 2% of stretch, just for comfort’s sake and recoverability. Mine aren’t even lined which is unusual for me but the seams were pressed three times and then overlocked.

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I reckon I’ll be wearing these with a plain black top and a colourful cardi or jacket. They look equally good with high heels or flats and have slim enough legs that they will easily slip into a pair of boots.

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This die hard Vogue girl is mightily impressed with a different pattern company.