corecouture

Essential sewing keeping me clothed and sane


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A/W ’17 O1

This year it has taken three weeks of timetabled classes for me to become accustomed to constantly check my (apparently old-fashioned) wrist watch [does anyone else still wear one of these?] in order to ensure I am where I should be at a pre-designated time and additionally be well prepared for the scheduled lesson. This is the first week since the beginning of term that I haven’t been zombified by Friday. So, here I am out the other side and the best thing is that there has been time for sewing!!

Slide1You and I and been very patiently waiting for my homemade version of Oska. I am slightly wary of using the tradename just in case I get sued or something, so from now on my autumn/winter 2017 collection will be known as O.

 

I was hoping to visit a real live Oska shop in London when I was there for a short weekend a few weeks ago. However, my lunchtime flight was cancelled (not Ryan Air!) and I didn’t arrive until 11.30 at night. I believe most shops are closed at this time and the next day was spent in a hotel conference room with no windows before heading directly back to Heathrow. No shopping done at all, not even browsing. Going to an Oska shop is still on my To Do List.

I was very pleased to read your comments on my O plans and how many of you admire this style. Thank you. On with the show….

O1 constitutes one pair of trousers, two tops, a scarf and a jacket: worn today with a pair of Clark’s dark grey short biker boots.

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This is layered look – so let’s dissect.

Trousers: Marcy Tilton Vogue 9035 made in some Tencel type fabric in dark grey picked for for a fiver on the bargain table at the Spinning Wheel in Belfast. Pants (loose-fitting through) hips have waistband, yokes, side-front/side-back seams, no side seams, pleated lower edge, stitched hems, and fly zipper closing. All have topstitching.

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V9035Love ’em! Fitted at the waist and through the hips but flare out along the legs with pleats at the ankle to bring them back into narrowness. Two major issues though – no pockets (which is verging on catastrophic) and the interfaced back yoke which doesn’t have a facing – like honestly – we’d wear trousers with the interfacing showing! We may be home sewers but we do have standards. If you are making these, cut two back yokes and sandwich the interfacing in between; then treat as one piece.

The tops and scarf are made in cotton jersey that is somewhere between a T-shirt and sweatshirt weight in sky blue – no idea where I bought this from but I wish I could remember because I’d love some more in white, navy, olive, black and any other colour that’s available.

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Top layer top is a self made-up pattern: double layered with a front slit; elbow length kimono-like sleeves and scarf-like collar. The front slit allows for the bottom layer to be tucked in while the top layer hangs loose.

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Underneath is a long, long sleeved Grainline Hemlock T-shirt. Get your free pattern here.

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The scarf is just a long strip of leftover cotton jersey, dipped dyed at the ends and middle for a slight ombre look and ties the blues to the greys.

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To top it all off, the jacket is Kathryn Brenne Vogue 9162 with mods. Made from double faced wool jersey, in navy and grey. To be honest, the jacket deserves a write up on its own, so for now we’ll just look at it and I’ll provide in depth details another time.

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The best thing about the jacket is this….

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It turns inside out.

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Only three weeks until half-term… just where does the time go?

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All for Free

One Pirate pencil skirt

One Sorbetto top

One pair Barb pants

A few metres of Jacobean Floral Fantasy – a pique waffle type ponte double jersey in stylised Jacobean floral print. Fairy tale tree of life branches with deepest green foliage, and exotic blooms in coral, turquoise, aqua, gold and chartreuse intertwine across the dark cream base colour – from Fabworks (not for free!)

Put these elements together and you too can get the astronaut’s wife look.

If you are not already aware, then I’ll tell you –  it’s Indie Pattern Month at The Monthly Stitch. Four weeks in July of competitions, challenges, inspiration and sewing fun.

Week 1 – Dresses

Week 2 – New to Me

Week 3 – Hack it

Week 4 – Indie Royalty (Two garments that work as an outfit)

There’s some amazing prizes too, so get those machines threaded up and the Indie patterns out…..

I’m not planning on entering any of the competitions but I have discovered some amazing Indie patterns and some lovely sewing already, so the site is definitely worth a visit.

The real benefit of sewing very basic pieces is the little personal touches that you can add to them. Some extras that I added include – front welt pockets to the Barb pants.

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And that deep elastic waist is so comfortable and stable on the Barb pants that I used it on the pencil skirt too.

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Suck it in girl…

The Sorbetto top when tucked in and worn with a belt could create the impression of a dress or in combination with the Barbs – a jumpsuit: the most impracticable and useless garment ever designed for women (am I alone?).

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With so many colours in the three main pieces, adding a solid coloured top/skirt/trousers triples the wearing combinations.

With absolutely no intention of matching patterns nor concern for pattern placement, all the pieces are easy sews – quick to cut out (each piece has two pattern pieces apart from the waistbands), quick to sew, easy to wear. Use stretch fabric, that’s the only condition.

I folded the front pleat to one side of the Sorbetto and sewed a few buttons for a mock closure.

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Those Barb pants are the best! Much more flattering than leggings and just as comfortable and an added bonus is that you can nip down to K-Mart or Tesco’s without looking like you’re still in your jammies. I reckon these would work for yoga/exercise pants as well as PJs.

Sorbetto top is the most versatile and adaptable sleeveless top ever – whenever I have 1/2 metre leftover, I always reach for this pattern. Easily worn on its own but just as perfect as a camisole or a layering piece in colder seasons.

The Pirate pencil skirt is fast becoming another staple and elevates a simple knit skirt to sophisticated yet comfortable work-wear if sewn in a solid colour for conservative boardroom-wear.

Hello to all new followers and readers of this little amateur sewing blog. I hope you find something worthwhile.

 

 


35 Comments

Before it’s Too Late

As part of Catch-up Blogging, I have to show these trousers now before they fall out of season. They’re made with a navy wool tweed (admittedly a light tweed) but are really for winter wear. I’ve had the fabric for quite a while now and was intending to sew a smart pencil skirt at some time in the distant past, but there you go – no skirt but trousers. Do you often do that? Buy fabric with one plan in mind, only to change later.

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The pattern is Vogue 1508: Zandra Rhodes design. Simple straight legs, elasticated waist but with some added “Corecouture” bits and piecimgres-1es. The envelope photo shows the trousers as narrow legged but in reality mine are neither wide nor narrow – sort of in between.

I’ve made them before in a heavy tweed and was very pleased with fit and style.

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The Alterations

Firstly, mine are cropped. I do like a cropped trouser and with only 1m of fabric there had to beimgres-2 some concessions made somewhere. I know that some of you are not fans of cropped trousers and I am conscious that sometimes they look like they were made with too little fabric so I made a little feature out of the shortness. The hems are curved at the outside seams. I took the idea from vintage Vogue 1522 , Perry Ellis design – so a little 1980s vintage touch and emphasises that the cropped length was intentional.

Curved seams are never easy to sew. I used some bias tape to help keep the roundness and pressed like a mad woman. Sew the bias tape to the hem, clip if necessary: fold to the inside right along the edge, pin and press; topstitch in place and press again. It also helps to do this before you sew the trouser legs together at the inside seams so that you are working flat. Just leave a wee bit of bias tape hanging at each side to be slipped stitched over the hem of the inside seam.

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Trousers without pockets are pretty useless. Mostly I use my pockets for posing and not really for holding things but to me, they are essential part of a garment. I made single welt, slightly angled front pockets. See here for how to…..

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I didn’t line these ones but wear my trouser-petticoat underneath. These are brilliant; can be worn under any trousers that don’t have lining, including RTW, and fulfil the functions of all the benefits of lining – reducing creasing, preventing sagging at bum and knees, helps the hang of the fabric and an extra layer for warmth on colder days.

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All you have to do is use some good quality lining (mine are cotton/silk blend), use any old trouser pattern – no pockets, waistband or anything and if they are a bit loose that’s OK. Sew some elastic to the waist, overlock or hem the ends and you have a very useful trouser-petticoat.

But of course, as versatile as a pair of navy trousers are, it’s always best to sew a coordinating top – remember – outfits, not orphans – ONO!

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Nothing new here I’m afraid. Back to Vogue 1247 (OOP) and possibly the best pattern ever drafted with a bit of remnant viscose jersey picked up for a fiver at the Spinning imgresWheel in Belfast.

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It drapes beautifully and with those colours of blues, red-orange and white can be worn with a wealth of others. Not many alterations done here apart from lengthing the sleeves by simply cutting long and leaving off the cuff. The interesting piecing at the front is lost in the fabric pattern but it really does help with shape and drape.

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I might have added an inch or two to the length but it’s been so long ago that I can’t remember rightly. I was probably just using as much fabric as I could. By the way, I didn’t French the seams, the at-the-moment very well behaved overlocker did that bit for me. I’ve probably just put a curse on it now………

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Now I am well aware that my photography is pretty crap and I am not photogenic but could I just point out – primarily to those sewing bloggers who have a trillion ads on their pages – just because you’ve taken the photographs doesn’t mean you have to use them all. Front, back and sides are usually enough. It’s like writing an essay that just repeats itself, there’s nothing new added. Just saying………

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Hello to all new followers, you are very welcome and I’m quite surprised that as I haven’t posted in a month or so that you still think it’s worthwhile to add this blog to your feed. I am truly appreciative. Please share your ideas and thoughts in the comments, even if they’re not related to my current sewing projects.

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Until the next Catch-up Blog……….

 


19 Comments

Re-Entry

Many of my blogging buddies seem to be taking sabbaticals – as I apparently have too – although not intentionally. Things just get in the way. I’ve been sewing and making, just not taking photos, posing, showing and telling. As the Easter holidays are fast approaching I should have more spare time and I’ll try to make more of an effort; attempting to match my blogging with my sewing.

I’ll start with a nice little simple  jumper (UK), sweater (US) – did I get that right? A gentle slide back into blogging. A useful top layer on chillier days and summer evenings.

I started with Vogue 9193 Marcy Tilton top and pants and a soft wool mix from Sherwood p1030377Fabrics in a very delicate shell pink (it comes in pale blue too). The knitted fabric has a lace-like quality. Easy pattern with cut on sleeves, scooped neck and loose fitting. Each pattern piece is cut on a single layer because of the slanted hemline, so pin everything on before cutting just in case……..

V9193I only cut out the top sections of the pattern, not the bottom bits with the pocket and lengthened one side to 22″ and the other to 26″ for an asymmetrical hemline.

The edges are finished with the selvedge for a neatness.

I added one patch pocket on the longer side just because.

There was a leftover piece of the knit fabric and I’ve been seeing a lot of poncho/shrug things in the shops. On closer inspection, these are a bit of fabric folded over with a seam at one shoulder and a hole for the head. Easy-peasy.

I took my bit of fabric, folded it, seamed the open edge, overlocked the long edges, found a button that matched and stitched this mid way.DSCN6967

I have two openings in my version of the poncho/shrug and can wear it diagonally over my jumper to offset the asymmetry and add an extra layer. One hole for my head , the other for my arm.

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But the little add-on can be worn as a hood or as a draped scarf – very versatile.

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Worn today with a pair of burgundy wool Clovers, from Colette this shade of pink seems to go with practically every other colour. It’s almost a neutral.

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There you are – a soft re-entry back to blogging with a soft and easy jumper.

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40 Comments

A/W ’16 Mustard

My husband, before he became my husband, used to tell a very rude joke and the punch line was “mustard, custard and you, you big sh***!”  Anyway………he doesn’t tell the joke anymore and my next outfit for autumn/winter is complete.

Same trousers as the burgundy ones but this time with added inseam side pockets and turn ups at the hem.dscn6753

I like cropped winter trousers: they remind me of plus fours and country living, and I can wear either boots or shoes. Worn today with the shirt you’ve seen before.

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Johnny Rotten as an English country gentleman

 

All fabrics are from Fabworks – I’m Fabworks head to toe today! (Not sponsored by them btw).

18 TwistThe trousers are Donegal tweed: Warm, mellow, sunflower, saffron and turmeric tones weave through this gorgeous Donegal Tweed herringbone, evoking memories of relaxed autumnal strolls and the resting evening sunshine. Woven with the ever-present charcoal warp to form a reassuring background of chevrons; the Donegal yarn sitting in the mellow sunflower and mustard warp has pale straw, saffron and honey coloured flecks. This 100% new wool has a reassuringly soft texture, but remains a medium weight with a great handle and drape.

I mean, really, how could you not not fall for that?

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An easy method to elasticate a waist is this:

  1. Measure the elastic to your waist, stretching a little, and sew the ends together to make a band.dscn6678
  2. Quarter this band with pins and then match each pin with the four seams, front, back and sides.
  3. Serge or small zig-zag this band (yes, that is bra strap elastic) to the inside of your garment, lining up edge to edge.dscn6679
  4. Fold the elastic over to the inside and zig-zag in place to form a waistband.dscn6683

Neat and easy

The trousers are lined too. The lining is slip-stitched to the ‘waistband’ and hides the serged edges.

Even neater.

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As Sunflower Chunky Ribbed Knit is a beautiful knitted all wool fabric from Avoca, it’s a superb, brushed fabric with a medium weight soft drape and handle, and due to being knitted rather than woven it has a good natural lengthwise stretch with some stretch on the width too! The beautiful sunflower coloured yarn with darker and lighter tones throughout, has been knitted in a double row ribbed construction that has alternating fine black bands knitted in between to create the chunky rib affect.

See what I mean? I fell for that one too.

The jumper is hacked from a Burda pattern for a cardigan. I prepared the pattern many, many years ago before I understood and realised that patterns require an organisational system  of their own. I can’t bring to mind the actual pattern number ….It’s the one with the girl standing in front of a barn door……..

I used the raglan sleeves and the back yoke and front (with a centre seam) but I just made up the V neck front and added a small patch pocket. I also made front and back different lengths and put small slits at the sides to mark the step.

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It was fun mucking about with the stripes on the pattern pieces creating some interest and directional movement. The sleeves are bias cut, the back yoke and pocket on the horizontal, the fronts and lower back on the vertical.

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To keep the V neck as a V, I faced it with some cotton bias binding as a stabiliser. The fabric doesn’t fray but I thought that narrow cuffs would be a nice finishing touch on the sleeves. All seams are serged just in case.

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And of course there were leftovers and cut-offs. I used these up in the form of a beret and a couple of scarves in preparation of anticipation of a cold winter.

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Other things….

The postman brought some lovely things recently, mainly courtesy of a Vogue pattern sale. Fabworks also sent me the checked cotton shirting (far right) after I ordered and paid for it.

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One plus one together makes this, not 2.

The selvage was too good to cut off and throw away so it was used as a trim on all edges; cuffs, collar, button band and hem.

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I had fun with the stripes on this fabric too and I do hope you notice the almost perfect alignment across the fronts!

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Life’s been quite busy recently including a very pleasant weekend spent in London, England. A few weeks ago I flew out early on Friday with plans afoot to spend a lot of money and spend a lot of money I did! The fruits of these purchases to be revealed soon. The highlight of the trip was dinner at Kate’s. Marijana was there too and we all wore our own individual, handmade, couture and unique versions of the Six Napoleon dress. We had a 6Nap party!

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I look like a giant in comparison to my petite and neat sewing companions. Additionally their dresses were so much better than mine. Both ladies are fabulous and I’m so pleased to have met them online and then followed this up in person. Thank you Kate and Marijana, it was so much better than sitting in a hotel room on my lonesome wearing a party dress with no party to go to.

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